Archive for the ‘religion’ Category

Mission Debriefing: Genesis

Posted: January 29, 2015 in atheism, morality, religion
Tags: ,

Ah, Genesis… where it all began. Literally. So much good (or not) stuff here. If nothing else, it is fertile ground for vivid, interesting mental images. Some of those mental images are of massive amounts of death, but yay for creation stories! Creation stories are always interesting, regardless how nonsensical they might be.

The Good

Creation: This is a big one in terms of praiseworthy things. Creating all existence is awesome! Good on ya God! There’s some wrinkles to be ironed out in terms of how and why, but creating everything is definitely a great accomplishment and everything in history depended on it. We can quibble about impressive-good being different than moral-good, but for simplicity sake, I’m counting it.

Other things I marked as “good” was promising never to kill everyone (with a flood) again (9:13-16), and two different instances of blessing Abraham (12:2-3; 17:1-8). The blessings of Abraham were entirely arbitrary on God’s part as far as I can tell, but I think they still count. I’m still not sure if promising not to murder the population in a certain way counts as properly good—one would expect not murdering everything would be the default setting for anyone, let alone a supposedly loving, all-powerful entity—but the pickings were kinda slim.

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Mission Debriefing: Prelude

Posted: December 25, 2014 in atheism, religion

I have been horribly slacking in my blogging activities of late. There’s work and getting sick and krav and all so many things to take up my time. Plus a lot of my at-home writing time has been taken up with writing about Wookiees. Because… well, Wookiees are awesome. But, if nothing else, the Christmas season—along with the almost obligatory hordes of internet whiners complaining about the “War on Christmas”—has reminded me that I’ve been shirking my “religious” mission.

As mentioned in my first “mission” post, I am slowly working on re-reading the bible. I am not simply reading it, however. I am taking many notes as I go. Mostly I’m focusing on what god does, and if it is good or bad. Also the devil, but hasn’t shown up yet. I’m keeping a running score.

I’ve been reading very slowly since anything that isn’t an article these days has a hard time keeping my attention. That said, I’m somewhere in Leviticus and have been reading a book of apocrypha in tandem. While I admit the apocryphal books are far more interesting and far less full of genocide than the books of the bible, they are not my focus. Gotta get back to that good old “good book.”

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Torreano David Stanley is a 20-year-old from the Bronx who identifies as gender fluid—female most days. Photo by Michael Rubenstein for NBC News. Photo and article found at http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/left-behind-lgbt-homeless-youth-struggle-survive-streets-n157506

Torreano David Stanley is a 20-year-old from the Bronx who identifies as gender fluid—female most days. Photo by Michael Rubenstein for NBC News. Photo and article found in the link provided in the text.

This morning I read the article Left Behind: LGBT Homeless Youth Struggle to Survive on the Street and it inspired a surprisingly intense emotion for me. Yes, there was depression over the situation and sympathy/empathy for those individuals whose stories were told. That’s not too surprising.

But what did surprise me was an intense anger. A very sudden, very extreme flame up of anger. And specifically anger at religion. No, not just religion; anger at American christianity.

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This post from over at Why Evolution is True brought up some points I have long wondered about with christianity; If people claim to believe that Adam and Eve and the garden are all just metaphorical, how does the rest of the boat that is the religion stay afloat?

Why Evolution Is True

To those who claim that there’s no incompatibility between science and religion, read this:

Bryan College is a small, conservative Christian school in Dayton, Tennessee, deliberately placed in the town that hosted the 1925 Scopes Trial, and where the school’s namesake, William Jennings Bryan (who was one of those testifying against Scopes for teaching human evolution), died shortly after the trial.

As I’ve posted before (here and here), the College is in a ferment over a topic close to my heart: the historicity of Adam and Eve.  It turns out that the college’s recent insistence that faculty and staff swear to an oath affirming that historicity is tearing the college apart. Even conservative Christians, it seems, have trouble believing that Adam and Eve were the literal ancestors of humanity.  That historicity has become increasingly problematic since the appearance of new papers in population genetics, showing that over the last few…

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BlogThinker

The Thinker, bronze sculpture by Auguste Rodin. Photo by “Karora,” taken 13 August 2007, released to the public domain. Retrieved from wikimedia commons.

It’s been an odd week so far. Crazy, yet sympathetic, tin-foil hat person on Monday, disturbing dream on Tuesday that kept distracting me, and today… well, today was contemplative. Contemplative is, for me, decidedly in the “good day” category, but that doesn’t make the day a simple one.

Anyway, got to the end of the day and got into a fun conversation with someone. Started off as politics, then migrated to the topic of groups which feel entitled to act against other groups (in this case, we were talking about radical environmental groups who sue the government to enforce their ideals of what use public lands should be put to), and that eventually got us on the topic of religious law versus social or formal law.

Though we never really talked about it in so many words, a good deal of our conversation centered on the concept of objective versus subjective morality. Oddly enough, he from a religious perspective argued the subjective side, while I from the atheistic perspective argued the objective morality side. Stereotypically, that set-up is reversed with the believer arguing for the existence of an objective (god-given) morality and the atheist arguing for a subjective (culturally-based/situationally-based) morality.

It was a very stimulating conversation, however, like so many of the sort, amounted to little more than running on the mental treadmill; energizing and works some muscles, but doesn’t get you anywhere.

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Image

Here’s my NIV bible I received back when I was going through confirmation. Note the pink, blue and orange sticky notes. The orange notes on the side are my notes to myself, the blue are notations of when god did something good, and the pink are notations of when god did something evil. I plan to do the same for satan/the devil along the bottom once that character shows up in the story, but thus far he’s not been introduced.

I have accepted the mission, set by my curiosity in my fellow human, to re-read the bible. My goal is to try to understand why its legions of followers have dubbed it the “Good Book.”

Now, I have read it before, though it was a long time ago. I read the entire book—cheating a bit by skipping all the “begats” portions—when I was going through confirmation when I was about 11. We were instructed to read the bible, and so I did. It did not take long before the overwhelming details of  god commanding death, war, genocide, rape, slavery, torture and otherwise doing or ordering his followers to do some decidedly evil shit that I decided there was a problem. I went to my pastor with questions, and he said to read the bible, as it would answer my questions, so I pressed on.

Long story short, I read it, had ten times more questions at the end than I had early on when I questioned him, the paltry answers I got were in no way satisfying, and ultimately I realized none of what I’d been told in church or read in the bible made any sense.

TL;DR: Read bible –> become atheist.

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